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Archive for the ‘Corporate Rebels’ Category

As many of you know, my “night-job” is Corporate Rebels United, a movement to unite Corporate Rebels worldwide to ensure that true change happens virally from deep within the fabric of our organisations.

Every month we celebrate a Corporate Rebel who went the extra-mile: in helping our movement, in completing a hack, in pulling together a value practice, or doing something really awesome in the organisation they work for. “Rebel of the Month” is recognition for a Corporate Rebel exposing the sort of behaviours we would like to encourage in our movement.

Our “Rebel of the Month” for March 2015 is Steve Chapman from Esher, Surrey, United Kingdom.

Steve Chapman - March 2015 (Hi res colour)

Steve is fascinated by human beings, how they interact, fall out, make up, change and create stuff together. Before becoming an independent consultant, writer and coach he spent 20 years in the corporate world, his last role being Director of Leadership and Organisation Development for a large global blue chip. It was during this time that he became intrigued by the difference between what is supposed to happen in organisations versus what actually happens. He started to notice how many of the unquestioned corporate traditions (such as strategy, structure, change management, governance, meetings etc.) actually constrained the very things that organisations need to survive and thrive in the future – imagination, creativity, spontaneity and innovation. He decided to dedicate his work to making sense of all of this and thereby transformed his corporate career into creative adventure.

can scorpions smoke 2

Steve’s book Can Scorpions Smoke? Creative Adventures in the Corporate World (Amazon Associates Link) invites those who work in these things we call organisations to pause, look around and become more curious as to what extent day to day habits, norms, behaviours and beliefs stifle our own creativity and that of others. At its heart it encourages experimentation and playfulness in the belly of corporate life and offers a number of personal and organisational practices that gently dampen the psychological and social fear that keeps everything rather stuck, dull and grey.

Six Creative Practices at the heart of “Can Scorpions Smoke?”

  • Mad, bad and wrong: Letting go of our need to be perpetually seen as sane, good and right.
  • Say “yes” (to the mess): Letting go of saying “no” to novelty and brave new experiences.
  • Be obvious/be altered: Letting go of a need to be perceived as clever, original and impervious to the influence of others.
  • Fail Happy: Letting go of our need to perpetually succeed and our habit of avoiding the unknown through fear of messing up.
  • Embody it: Challenging the dictatorship of the logical brain and building a deeper trust with our physical and emotional instincts.
  • Make others look good: Championing and nurturing the creative spirit of others.

Chapman himself endeavours to practice what he preaches and continually tries to push the boundaries of his work through experimentation on the boundaries his own comfort zone. To this end he has run masked corporate innovation workshops, delivered off the wall, highly participative keynote speeches (one dressed as a pirate for example), taken his coaching clients on spontaneous ‘inexpert’ tour guide experiences and he launched his book by going busking on the banks of the Thames.

His current research interest is “The Failure Project” which aims to deconstruct the concept of failure through studying the rich experience of screwing up in excruciating slow-motion!

Steve is Chief Adventurer at Can Scorpions Smoke Change a Creativity Ltd. He has worked with a wide range of organisations and individuals helping them through times of change by nurturing their imaginative, creative and spontaneous talents. He is a regular speaker on change, creativity and innovation and is visiting faculty at Ashridge Business School and the Metanoia Institute. He is the author of “Can Scorpions Smoke? Creative Adventures in the Corporate World” – an acclaimed book on personal and organisational creativity. He is a blogger, a runner, an improviser and Daddy to Maya, aged 8, who is his Chief of Imagination and illustrator of the book.

Steve is based in Esher, Surrey, UK

Please join us in congratulating Steve for being our March 2015 Rebel of the Month

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A couple of months ago, I was at Techonomy 2014 and I am still digesting a fantastic interview with Peter Thiel and Reid Hoffman. Interview done by David Kirkpatrick from Techonomy Media.

The full interview (about 38 min) is worth every second, and the full transcript is available here.

Thiel and Hoffman

There is a great section about innovation and innovation teams in big corporations, and Reid says:

I think the challenge in practice is, I often think of the people that are able to drive innovation in one way or another as being quite weak at the political games, and the political processes—the more political processes you set up, it always seems to empower the wrong people.

To a question from the audience on how innovations teams can avoid this, Reid Hoffman says at minute 28:40 something that made me fundamentally rethink how companies should get organized around innovation, or disruption, or whatever the latest buzzword of the year is.

Well, the short answer there is, having a head of strategy, a head of innovation and a small group is almost always—I’ve never seen it work, it’s usually a disastrous failure. The question is, you actually have to be, we’re going and building this product, we’re going and doing this, and it has to be essentially funded, and as an isolated group.

And there’s a lot of different ways of doing an isolated group. I don’t know them all, throughout all the industries. One was how Jobs did it, which is, he basically said, okay, he pulled people into a project and put them in a room where only their badges would work. He would go work with them. Part of a thing that happens at Google, and, you know, there’s variation, like there’s when Andy Rubin was building Android, only the Android folks’ badges were working, going into the Android, and basically Larry was like “Look, Andy, just go, this is important to do, just make this happen.”

I think the common pattern is, it has to be a product-oriented group, it isn’t a group that says we’re producing a strategy, or we’re producing an innovation plan.

We’re building something, we’re making it happen, and it’s empowered by the CEO, and it is completely disconnected from any political process from the rest of the organization.

And I think thus far, those are the only patterns I’ve seen work. The CEO often has to have an opinion on the product, on the merits of the product, so it’s not a portfolio, it’s not a financial portfolio, a hundred different innovations without any details on any one particular.”

This is something very different than the so called “experimentation sandboxes”, or “innovation labs”, or “customer innovation centers”, or “accelerators”, or “incubators”.

Leandro Herrero recently writes:

Carve out space and time, protect them, and free them from the standard corporate rules. You can do this with a small team or a big one, a few rooms, one room, or a building. Do it forever, or for 3 months. Experiment with your own version of Lab126. Social engineer the environment until you see the fruits. Kindle ideas! We shape the spaces so that spaces may shape us.

I am not so sure this works. Austin Carr wrote in Jan 2015 a great post in FastCompany about the Fire Phone debacle that was developed in that same Lab126.

Yet is there something new going on with Amazon, something dangerous on a whole new level? Or is this the latest installment in what Bezos has always been selling about his company: that it is so different in its outlook, its operations, and its potential that it should be judged differently, too? The criticism this time goes beyond the fact that the CEO prefers to invest heavily in what might drive business tomorrow rather than reap profits today. This time, say the critics, Bezos has lost his focus. This time, they say, he is pursuing global domination at the expense of his historic drive to improve the customer experience.

To make a long story short, I don’t believe anymore in open innovation, and I don’t believe anymore in sandboxes.

Many sandboxes are “me too” versions of a hype for being perceived or associated with the next Google or the next Apple. Let’s be realistic, the chance that your company ever gets close to those top players is close to zero. Same for the incumbent turning around itself for the next paradigm: there is historical evidence that the chance to succeed is also close to zero. If you disagree, please give me 1-5 examples of companies who did succeed.

But don’t get me wrong. Innovation is needed, especially in incumbent large organisations. To create real lasting innovation in big corporations, you need:

  • High quality alignment about the strategic options and the innovation agenda at the level of the board, and the executive committee. All organizations struggle with this. It creates illusions of innovation busyness and quasi satisfaction of having ticked the box
  • Willingness to invest in several real options, and actually do something beyond analyzing and prototyping to death.
  • You need to SHIP product

Let me say that again: you need to ship product.

It’s about focus based on quality alignment. The focus to put the energy of a multi-disciplinary team through the full A-Z process of designing, creating, marketing, distributing a product service in the hands of the customer who gets value and is willing to pay for it.

Let’s apply this to FinTech. Fintech is red-hot.

  • With 3-6 Billion dollar investment per year in startups, depending on the source.
  • Investments by VCs, Corporate Venture Funds, pooled resources in accelerators, bootcamps and incubators.
  • And with almost every major bank having their own innovation outpost or lab or accelerator in Silicon Valley, and increasingly also in APAC, Tel-Aviv, London and Berlin.

Their challenge is to find the best startups. Depending on the source, more than 3,000+ FinTech Startups compete for the money and the attention. Investors are looking for the best ones. Banks are looking for the best ones. But their motivations are different. From pure ROI and fast and profitable exit to complementarity of the existing portfolios.

One way to find the best ones are FinTech Startup competitions. We at Innotribe run one ourselves quite successfully. Nothing wrong with Startup Challenges.But I believe the industry needs to move beyond competition and prize money. Beyond the searchable database or heat map. Beyond the hackaton. Beyond the prototype, the sandbox, the accelerator or the lab.

The keyword is embedding and creating deep, sustainable, repeatable relationships on the long term.

Accelerators, Bootcamps, Incubators, and Sandboxes: I get it. It’s all super cool there, it’s fun, young, dynamic, exciting, etc but show me the results from an innovation point of view, aka actually shipping of actual innovations by big corporations/banks. I am not asking for investment results, etc. I am trying to find systemic evidence that sandboxes help companies innovate in or outside their core.

My discomfort is that the motivations of the different players are not aligned:

I do see the value for the sandboxes, accelerators, incubators. For the startups joining, in many cases some form of cheap equity or other string is attached. Cheap for the investor that is. The startup immediately loses 10% or more of its shares in return for this generous gift.

I do see the value for the startups. Investment, visibility, mentors etc.

  • But that is just the start, that is just the sandbox.
  • When – and if – they come out of an incubator etc, the journey just begins.
  • The only thing they have learned is to pitch better and to better iterations of MVPs, at best.

But I do not yet see what meat is left on the bone of those who invested in these sandboxes?

  • Did any ever succeed in actually shipping a new product/service?
  • Indeed, I am looking at this space from the standpoint of the organization who owns the sandbox/accelerator/incubator and what value it provides to that organization in better serving its customers.

I am getting convinced that sandboxes “out there” – as an outpost that is – don’t work. Work in the sense of getting products shipped with the core. I am getting convinced that organizations don’t need one sandbox but thousands (ok, ten’s) of sandboxed deeply embedded in the organization.

The sandbox then is not just about experimenting but about actually shipping a product, and show/inspire the others in the company in a super-transparent way how that is done, so that next time they want to be part of the project too.

However, in many cases sandboxes are lipstick on a pig. I love this Financial News article about everybody cool and running hackatons:

“So they are engaging with the outside world for new ideas and inputs. They really, really want to look like a cool place to work at. They seek to be perceived more like large tech companies.”

In many cases it’s all about perception, only.

But perception is not good enough. It is needed, but not good enough. In my opinion, if a company cannot innovate in its core, it has a problem. Innovating without the complexity of the core is relatively easy, especially of you can throw 100M at it. But does it leave innovation meat on the core bone? I doubt it.

Innovation by committee does not work. The false certainty of the committee kills it.

Real innovation happens when you have a dedicated multidisciplinary team going after a big bet. Real innovation does not happen in sandboxes. I have seen it in my SWIFT life several times. Some were successful like Alliance Lite and more recently the Real-Time Payments win in Australia. Others failed to deliver or got killed (the death and killing of innovative projects and the lessons learned will be the subject of another post in this Innovation 201 series).

To come back to the start of this blog post and the insights of Reid Hoffman. The successful innovations are not the credit of a central innovation team. They are the credit of a dedicated core team.

But a team alone won’t cut it. This team, the “execution engine”, is only one of the 3 innovation engines needed in an organization. The other two are 1) the behavior (culture) engine and 2) the catalyst engine. More on them in a subsequent post.

3 inno engines

One thing is for sure: ALL organizations struggle getting stuff out of the sandbox. Maybe the problem is with the whole idea of sandbox in the first place. If it never gets in, you don’t need to struggle to get it out.

Embedding or Sandboxing: I think embedding is the answer. So let’s get out of the innovation sandbox and let’s get some real stuff shipped?

Some modesty is at its place here. I have been working as a change agent – sometimes rebel – in many organizations in the last 30 years. And still, I don’t know the perfect answer. But I think I have a little clue on what does not work, and what could work. I would love to open the conversation with the Heads of Innovation to share what sticks and what not. I am so curious to hear your voices, comments, insights and your lessons learned.

This blog post is part of my series “Innovation 201”

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There are plenty of actionable items on our Corporate Rebels United (CRU) website. Most folks don’t explore the website. They like the manifesto and that gets them going.

The going so far is mainly sharing of posts, articles and sometimes experiences. And that sharing is great. Continue doing that.

But I would love to see 2015 becoming more actionable and more about DOING.

In these regular callings to our movement, I will invite you to actually DO something and I will seed some ideas that may get you inspired.

Kid pirate thinkstock

This Feb 2015 Calling is for Corporate Rebels out there who are Creatives / Artists / Creators: photographers, graphical artists, visual artists, video hackers, musicians, writers, poets, choreographers, coders, etc who can help us with:

  • Creating a new Corporate Rebels United logo that could be used consistently on buttons, flags, t-shirts, social media, etc
  • To create a set of consistent visual elements (picture, icons, typography, colours, etc) that we can use on our website and publications.
  • To make a powerful teaser video on Corporate Rebels United that could go viral
  • To create/compose the Corporate Rebels United song
  • To make a RSA animation (or other, use your creativity) video of the Corporate Rebels United presentation at Enterprise 2.0 Summit, 10-12 Feb 2014, Paris. See also our events page.
  • Any other crazy idea you may come up with

So roll up your sleeves and enlist as a CRU creative on the candidate form at the bottom of our helpers page.

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It has always been my dream to organize a live face-to-face event with and for Corporate Rebels United. But there was always the concern of personal financial risk and logistics of such undertaking. That’s why we stayed “online” with Rebel Jam etc).

Many of you also know that I would like to evolve my Innotribe@Sibos work into a some sort of 4-day content-festival-format, intersected with high quality artistic performances.

Now both become possible. Now that day has come. I have teamed up with RELEVENTS as a “curator-in-residence”. RELEVENTS is a new organization led by professionals who want to re-invent the whole conference format. We aim for relevant events.

Relevents Logo

We’re partnering to bring a Corporate Rebels United chapter to the Innovate Festival @TBD on September 16-18, along side the TBD Festival of Music, Arts and Culture on the Sacramento’s historic riverfront.

 

TBD-with-date

 

TBD stands for To Be Determined – To Be Discovered – To Be Designed – To Be DISRUPTED the absolute right vibe for you all Corporate Rebels United.

As curator in residence, I will be inviting local and global innovators from Corporate Rebels United to explore what it means to tap creativity, innovate and solve problems together in context, not theory, now. We will be looking for vibrant examples, compelling problems, radical problem solvers.

You will all get invited to come to Innovate Festival @ TBD. There will be a fee to attend but we have negotiated a special discount code for Corporate Rebels United. So, we hope we will see many of you – mainly US bases Corporate Rebels – to launch, get discovered, roll up your sleeves and work and experiment with, not just listen to, the world’s greatest innovators.

Innovate Festival @TBD will take place from Sep 16-18, 2015 in Sacramento, California. Block these dates in your calendars.

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A Rebel Jam is a 24h online event with fascinating speakers, inspiring entertainment and provocative discussions every hour, with hosts/moderators from our Rebels community in Europe, North America and Asia.

We did one in 2013 and we we’ll do another one this year on 26 June 2015. Our aim: empower the rebel to be able to create positive change, understanding the considerable risks and challenges that will arise.

On June 26-27, 2015 we will hold another 24 hour on-line Rebel Jam. All you’ll need is to be able to connect to the Internet and mark your calendar right now.

You will be able to tune in any time – or all 24 hours if you’re one of the crazy ones – to learn from Rebels about:

  • What has helped them to be successful?
  • Setbacks and obstacles they’ve experienced and how they’ve navigated through them.
  • Habits that help them stay creative, positive and respected.

We will focus on storytelling to share your bravery and to help other going beyond their fear sticking out their neck and daring to be great.

There will be time after each speaker for questions and conversations to encourage as much learning and camaraderie as possible in an online way. We’ll also be inviting performers and artists to share and perform their work with us to fill our rebel spirits, and just have some fun.

The Rebel Jam kicks off on June 26 at noon in Europe; 6 a.m. North America East Coast; 3 a.m. North America Pacific, and 8 p.m. Sydney. 

The Rebel Jam 2015 is a co-production of Rebels at Work and Corporate Rebels United

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As many of you know, my “night-job” is Corporate Rebels United, a movement to unite Corporate Rebels worldwide to ensure that true change happens virally from deep within the fabric of our organisations.

Every month we celebrate a Corporate Rebel who went the extra-mile: in helping our movement, in completing a hack, in pulling together a value practice, or doing something really awesome in the organisation they work for. “Rebel of the Month” is recognition for a Corporate Rebel exposing the sort of behaviours we would like to encourage in our movement.

Our “Rebel of the Month” for February 2015 is Mukesh Gupta from Bangalore.

Mukesh_Headshot

He is an entrepreneur at heart and employee by choice. He is a corporate rebel and a change agent.
His day job is with SAP India as Director – Customer Advocacy and his passion is to help small business owners and startup founders build the organization that they would be proud of.
His mission is to re-invent sales:
  • The ever connected, social and mobile world has transformed how people buy (from other people or from other businesses).
  • The social media revolution has given consumers and buyers power to talk back to brands.
  • The rapid growth of online commerce (e-commerce or m-commerce) raises a question mark on the existence of many sales professionals.
  • The sales processes and methodologies have not kept up with this transformation of the buyers world.

The way we sell, measure the performance of the sales executives, work with other parts of our organization needs to be transformed for the sales executives to not only remain relevant but thrive in this new reality.

Mukesh volunteered on the Corporate Rebels United website to lead a new set of Value creation practices for the sales organziations which can help them thrive and grow! Check out his page: http://corporaterebelsunited.com/practices/practice-3-re-inventing-sales/

Mukesh is also a great example on using social media to reach out to his community: he blogs at http://www.rmukeshgupta.com and hosts his podcast – Pushing Beyond the Obvious (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/pushing-beyond-the-obvious/id887956450).

Mukesh is an author, blogger and podcaster. He has written the world’s first business poem – Your Startup Mentor, available exclusively on Kindle.

Mukesh is based in India, Bangalore.

Please join us in congratulating Mukesh for being our Feb 2015 Rebel of the Month

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As many of you know, my “night-job” is Corporate Rebels United, a movement to unite Corporate Rebels worldwide to ensure that true change happens virally from deep within the fabric of our organisations.

At the end of 2014, we had something to celebrate: without any marketing we stealthily became a flat army of 1,000+ corporate rebels! From San Francisco to New Zealand and everything in-between, and really cross-industry. We had a toast on that one!

Every month we would try to celebrate a Corporate Rebel who went the extra-mile: in helping our movement, in completing a hack, in pulling together a value practice, or doing something really awesome in the organisation they work for. “Rebel of the Month” is recognition for a Corporate Rebel exposing the sort of behaviours we would like to encourage in our movement.

Our first “Rebel of the Month” in 2015 is Khurshed Dehnugara from London.

KD Headshot 3a

Khurshed has had two careers, ten years as a senior executive for a complex, global corporate followed by fifteen years coaching and facilitating those leading them. He describes himself in both cases as having one foot inside and one foot outside the established system and culture. He describes that position as one of a Challenger – akin to our concept of being a corporate rebel.

His latest book “Flawed but Willing – Leading Large Organizations in the Age of Connection” (Amazon Affiliate Link) has at its heart the premise that there is a different quality of leadership needed as our corporations move from an industrial age to one that is defined by connection. One that is defined by our flaws rather than our perfection, where power is a function of quality of contact rather than hierarchy. An age in which we are never able or expected to be in control and yet can generate more creativity and growth than the Industrial Age imagined was possible.

Flawed by Willing

The writing is full of stories as the primary currency of contact, a voice more aligned with contemporary fiction than traditional business writing. It is playful and vulnerable, reflecting both his and his clients flaws as they do the hard work of being a rebel in a corporate culture that often wants to reject them. And at the same time there is an optimism; a persistence that comes from knowing it was never going to be easy and that overcoming repetitive defeats is part of our work.

Khurshed has a shout of for Corporate Rebels United on page 35 of his book, reproducing our Manifesto and linking it back to his table of the way organizations are integrating the new age into the old one.

Industrial Age Age of Connection
Machine metaphor Environment metaphor
Inherently stable Inherently unstable
Efficient dominant Adaptability dominant
Leader as controller Leader as wizard
Control through sign-off Control through self policing
Teacher as expert Community as expert
Architects Artists
Perfectionism Fast failure
Hierarchy Network
Fleas live of elephants Fleas can kill elephants
High growth, minimal fluctuation Low growth, maximum fluctuation
Relatively closed-off, defended from the outside world Highly permeable to the outside world
Rigid but mostly secure employment Voluntary, flexible, insecure employment
Leader as jerk. Can survive and thrive across whole career Leader as jerk. Gets exposed and rejected quickly
Self-interest Collective Interest

Khurshed is Partner at Relume Ltd. He is based in London.

Please join us in congratulating Khurshed for being our Jan 2015 Rebel of the Month

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