Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Belgian Pavilion Venice cropped

Belgian Pavilion Biennale Venice
Petervan Productions 2017 - Acryl on canvas - 90x60 cm
Advertisements

delicacies

Edition-100 of Delicacies: As usual, max 5 articles that I found interesting and worth re-reading. Handpicked, no robots. Minimalism in curation. Enjoy!

If you can’t get enough of these and want more than 5 articles, I have created an extended version of Petervan’s Delicacies in REVUE. If you want more than 5 links, you can subscribe here: https://www.getrevue.co/profile/petervan

Musikheim, main hall, Frankfurt:Oder, 1929 He befriended fellow modernist Walter Gropius, and helped draw up the curriculum for Gropius_s design school, the Bauhaus Photograph- © Ate

Musikheim, main hall, Frankfurt/Oder, 1929
The Bauhaus Photograph- © Atelier Leopold Haase & Co

A couple of months ago a started a research on “deep” change. Check out the previous posts here and also this one where I highlighted the importance of patrimony and its combination with contemporary. Or the combination of the core organisational DNA with the DNA of innovation.

Although the term “deep” is a somewhat glorifying term – as glorifying as “meaningful” or “authentic” – it has some meaning as the change I am trying to describe probably has its source in the more deeply wired connections in our brains and being fully conscious, as opposed to the western consciousness – starting more or less with Pythagoras – which is anchored in a two dimensional, linear either/or Boolean consciousness.

With my background training as an architect, I have probably developed a greater multi-dimensional sensitivity about spaces, and I stumbled by accident on the notion of space and/or structure as a store for memories, or wisdom if you want.

Lately, I am noticing plenty of videos that use connected particles moving around in some kind of grid, creating patterns of movement.

Here is one video by futurist Gerd Leonhard about the tension Technology vs. Humanity and the connectedness or over-connectedness of humans and things.

The moving grid/nodes representations made me think of some artwork I discovered lately by visual artist Simone Reuss on spacial relations. The original post and background is here, but I made my own little animation with it and added a self-composed soundtrack. I made it as part of a brand new presentation/performance on the topic of “deep” change.

 

Spacial relationships may be one of the aspects of being human that we are losing by using too augmented reality. Like you loose your physical orientation skills by driving/walking around all the time with Google Maps or GPS driving.

I like the idea of human movements creating invisible spaces of memory. Leaving traces of flows and movements.

In the second part of my short movie, you will see a drawing documenting human flows in an office building. How humans cut corners, how their movements are dictated by the structure/floor plan of the office. What I really like is how the artist made 3D prints in silicone of these patterns. It is as if the 3D print object is a store of memory of the movements and the structure.

02_plocka_movementspace_simoneruess_2012

Movement Spaces - Silicone 3R print - Simone Reuss - 2012

One can of course question what came or should come first: the structure influencing the flow, or the flow influencing the structure? I remember some Californian University experimenting with spaces with no walls, and let the users define “as-they-flow” where the separations should be.

Fluidity seems to always find its best structure

Flow happens first, it influences the structure and determines the capacity of the structure to further enable connections.

But that structure in its own terms then also becomes patrimony. A memory space. A tool to memorise and remember the patrimony memory of a talk, a plot, a corporate narrative, or a corporate DNA.

memory spaces

lukasa memory board. Courtesy Brooklyn Museum/Wikimedia

I learned that “Memory Palaces” are indeed an old mnemonic technique to build places of memory. Check out this great post about “Memory Palaces”.

Cultures without writing are referred to as ‘non-literate’, but their identity should not be associated with what they don’t do, but rather with what they do from necessity when there is no writing to record their knowledge. Cultures without writing employ the most intriguing range of memory technologies often linked under the academic term ‘primary orality’, including song, dance, rhyme and rhythm, and story and mythology. Physical memory devices, though, are less often included in this list. The most universal of these is the landscape itself.

It is about recording knowledge, or even better know-how, through experience, and not because being told/teached to do so.

Culture is recorded know-how.

Is there a way to “design” the such spaces of memory? Joe Brewer has done some solid work with his Culture Design Labs, laying the groundwork for a design science of intentional social change to rapidly evolve our systems of government, the practices and structures of market economies, pathways through educational institutions, and journalism models in the media. 

1-3UloFel_nyidL8w-feEsCw

Not as some loose theory of change, but by creating a rigorous scientific model. That’s interesting and refreshing: looking at change as a science, not as a theory.

Every story, every organisation has structure. How did that structure come into being? How do we change structure? How do we change flows influencing that structure? Or as Jean Russell says: how do we cultivate flows?

Hope it sparks something 😉 Cheers!

petervan-signature

I am in the business of cultivating high quality connections and flows to create immersive learning experiences and structural change. Check out: https://petervanproductions.com/

 

 

 

delicacies

Edition-99 of Delicacies: As usual, max 5 articles that I found interesting and worth re-reading. Handpicked, no robots. Minimalism in curation. Enjoy!

If you can’t get enough of these and want more than 5 articles, I have created an extended version of Petervan’s Delicacies in REVUE. If you want more than 5 links, you can subscribe here: https://www.getrevue.co/profile/petervan

delicacies

Edition-98 of Delicacies: As usual, max 5 articles that I found interesting and worth re-reading. Handpicked, no robots. Minimalism in curation. Enjoy!

If you can’t get enough of these and want more than 5 articles, I have created an extended version of Petervan’s Delicacies in REVUE. If you want more than 5 links, you can subscribe here: https://www.getrevue.co/profile/petervan

 

Prudent Radicalness

I have a file on my computer called “Open Threads”. It’s a collection of reflections, thoughts, interesting articles, links etc. A sort of inspiration scratch book indeed, where many of my blog posts are emerging.

IMG_5029

Petervan Productions – Build up of art studio – Sep 2017

I am in the process of organizing my art studio (it still feels aseptic clean, as the floor, walls, pots, tables and canvasses still need to feel their first drop of paint). Now that I am more or less settled into our new home, I started opening up the different piles of notes, sketches, and also this Open Treads file. I  puts me in a state of fear and boredom, hungry for silence and serenity.

DSCF5443-600x900

Crete Senesi Festival Collegium Vocale - 2017 Edition

Browsing the inspiration scratch-book – listening to some heavenly polyphonic music by Collegium Vocale and dreaming away on their Crete Senesi Festival – I found back this interview of artist Philippe Vandenberg, interview by Hans Theys, a well known art critic and curator here in Belgium and beyond. I had the pleasure meeting Hans during his fireside chat with artist Hilde Overbergh in The White House Gallery some months ago, where we had a chat about bringing together art and business as part of Petervan Productions. I still have to followup on that conversation.

The interview is in Dutch, but is subtitled in English. I started to write the transcript of this interview, but then thought Hans may already have the full transcript. I asked, and indeed he has, and made it kindly available to me in both Dutch and English.

From the video description:

In this video we meet the artist Philippe Vandenberg in his studio in January 2009, a few months before his unexpected death. For 40 minutes the camera swerves through his studio, filming drawings, paintings, books, photographs and other objects scattered about while the artist is talking about his work.The central thought holds that Philippe Vandenberg considers himself to be a ‘witness for the prosecution’, which is described as ‘témoin à charge’ or ‘getuige ten laste’ in French and Dutch, implying a kind of ‘burden’. At the end of the film Vandenberg returns to this term and concept to characterise the artist Vincent Van Gogh.

I suggest to sit down and relax to view and listen to this interview. Some extracts that resonated with me:

  • I don’t call myself an artist. I consider myself more as a “Témoin à charge”
  • It is not about a theme. It is about an attempt.
  • Ultimately you can’t make anything without pleasure
  • I think boredom can function as a stimulating force. It’s a kind of latent masochism
  • A healthy dose of fear brings us into motion
  • Fear and boredom are surely twins
  • God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change
  • What fascinates me is that the noise of an image is inaudible. Images are silent. I am very fond of silence. Of the absolute silence. The noise an image produces is an inner sound. It’s less exhausting… than a symphony.
  • When I hear one of Wagner’s symphonies on the public radio, those very long symphonies of 1-2 hours, I always wonder what he must have felt when he composed them.
  • I’m am fond of swiftness (“schichten”). I love rapidity. I also paint very fast, in swift phases. I am not a painter who tortures himself for hours.
  • If the painting doesn’t cooperate, I will say: “OK”… I will put it aside and finish it later.
  • “Delay of execution” is a wonderful tradition.
  • I think we need to be alert. To survive.
  • The restless eye. “L’oeil intranquil”
  • Everything can be useful
  • What is inspires us more than television? You have to watch the BBC of course. For otherwise you could start believing you live in the center of the world. Above all the atrocity of the media resides in the mixture of comic and inhumane aspects.

I love the idea of a different type of attention. Being alert. L’oeil intranquil. An attention and attitude to “try to rid of the ‘noise’ that inevitably arises in the transfer from one generation to the next, with utmost care and precision.”

This is the idea of “Prudent Radicalness”, so well articulated by Belgian writer Stefan Hertmans as part of his intro (PDF) to the 2017 season of Collegium Vocale and the 70th birthday of their Artistic Director Philippe Herreweghe.

Philippe_Herreweghe-2-by-Michiel-Hendrickx-2013_470x370

Philippe Herreweghe - Artistic Director and Conductor Collegium Vocale

“What is authentic is the attention to detail in the score, to understanding what is on the page – not so much all the vague idealistic notions about what the intention can be, but what is concretely expected of the performer from measure to measure. Of course this 
also assumes context – cultural context, historical context, an understanding of the framework in which a given musical idea developed – but its core remains an ascetic interest in the concrete, or even more so: an interest that refuses to appropriate the historicising intentions of the music…. It assumes subservience and sovereignty in one.’

Subservience and sovereignty, and the restless eye to stay alert, being a “Témoin à charge”, get rid of the noise, and let others see what we see. These are some good principles to take with me on the rest of my journey.

petervan-signature

I am in the business of cultivating high quality connections and flows to create immersive learning experiences and structural change. Check out: https://petervanproductions.com/

Acknowledgements:

Hans Theys (Brussels, °1963) is a Belgian art critic and curator. He has written some thirty books on contemporary art and has published numerous essays, interviews and reviews in books, catalogues and magazines. He has curated 35 exhibitions. He teaches at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp and Ghent.

Transcript made possible and available thanks to the Vandenberg family and the Vandenberg Estate http://www.philippevandenberg.be/

Herfst/Autumn (poem)

Apple trees with red apples

Vervaagd

Het beeld van zondag

Een boomgaard vol fruit

Warmte onderhuids

De zoete hap vergeet de kleur van zon

Vliegensvlugge paardebloemen

Verstrooien nog snel het land met hun laatste zaad

Te laat

We moeten zoeken nu

naar een warm nest

in die berm van oneindige mildheid

rough translation

Autumn

Blurred

The bust of Sunday

An orchard full of fruit

Warmth under my skin

The sweet mouthful forgets the color sun

Speedy dandelions

Spawn brisk the land with their last seeds

Too late

We have to find a warm nest now

In that soft shoulder of endless indulgence

%d bloggers like this: